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The Most Beautiful Boulevard: Austria, Vienna Celebrates...

The Most Beautiful Boulevard: Austria, Vienna Celebrates Ringstrasse's 150th Birthday

With its resplendent marble museums, austere Habsburg palaces, and the soaring spires of government offices more beautiful than most cathedrals, Austria’s capital city is breathtaking. Visitors to central Vienna are often left enchanted by the Ringstrasse, the historic ring road encircling the city’s innermost district. But the five kilometre long promenade, which recently celebrated its 150th

The Austrian Parliament seen from the Vienna Ringstrasse, Vienna, Austria

With its resplendent marble museums, austere Habsburg palaces, and the soaring spires of government offices more beautiful than most cathedrals, Austria’s capital city is breathtaking. Visitors to central Vienna are often left enchanted by the Ringstrasse, the historic ring road encircling the city’s innermost district. But the five kilometre long promenade, which recently celebrated its 150th birthday on May 1st, is famous for more than just its grandeur. The Viennese Ring is one of the most culturally, architecturally and historically significant streets in the world.

The Ringstrasse was built on the site of the former city walls after the short-lived Viennese Revolution in 1848. The defensive walls, dating back to the 13th century, had successfully repelled the invading Ottoman Empire twice before. However, the introduction of firearms now rendered them largely obsolete. On May 1, 1865, Emperor Franz Josef I ordered their demolition and subsequent replacement with a grand boulevard showcasing the wealth and splendor of the Habsburg Empire.

Vienna's Citizen's Theatre on the Ringstrasse, Vienna, Austria

The result was a masterpiece of urban planning that is still marveled at today. Along with the magnificent array of royal palaces, theatres, museums and opera houses, a selection of more democratic buildings were constructed around the Ring – such as the City Hall, Parliament and UniversitySuch a large-scale construction project, set against the tumultuous backdrop of war-torn 19th Century Europe, was unprecedented at the time.

But for the urban planners of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, it may have been born out of necessity. Amid rising public discontent for the ruling elite, the once-protective city walls came to be seen as a symbol of oppression. They segregated the working-class suburbs from the ruling nobility in the centre. Franz Josef had observed Napoleon’s successful introduction of wider streets to France’s capital, Paris. There, with revolutions occurring every few years, it was not an attempt to placate the populace, but rather to prevent the erection of barricades during civil unrest.

Franz Josef’s architects, however, managed to instill a new-found sense of equality into the imperial capital through their particular brand of historicism. The Ring features an eclectic mix of styles supported by deeper symbolic meaning. The Parliament, with its stone columns and mythical statues, mimics the Greek temples in which modern-day democracy was first conceived. A short walk further around the Ring is the Rathaus, or Town Hall. A glorious, Neo-Gothic Cathedral with towering spires and intricate decoration, it was built to reflect the earliest town halls in the autonomous cities of medieval Belgium. Collectively, the style came to be known as Ringstrassenstil, or ring-road style.

Vienna's City Hall on the Ringstrasse, Vienna, Austria

A century and a half after its opening, the Ringstrasse remains an emblem of an imperial, austere Europe. Vienna, with its understated love for tradition, does its best to celebrate this. From the annual balls in the country’s grandest palaces to the quaint Viennese coffee houses accommodating the city’s intellectuals, it remains clear the Ringstrasse’s status in the Austrian capital has not diminished.

Have you visited Vienna’s Ringstrasse? What other streets or boulevards in your city can compare to this jewel of the Austrian capital? Share your stories and thoughts in the comments area below.

Credits: Images by Ajit Niranjan. Data linked to sources.

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Ajit is a freelance journalist and civil engineering student from Bristol, UK, who's currently living and working in Vienna, Austria. He's exploring the history and development of European cities.

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