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Book Review of "Walkable City: How Downtown Can Save Ame...

Book Review of "Walkable City: How Downtown Can Save America, One Step at a Time" by Jeff Speck

If you’re a planner and have tried to explain to everyday folks the importance of good planning, then you know it can be a difficult topic of interest. Most, either find the planning profession to be too regulatory or know nothing about it at all. In Jeff Speck’s “Walkable City: How Downtown Can Save America, One

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If you’re a planner and have tried to explain to everyday folks the importance of good planning, then you know it can be a difficult topic of interest. Most, either find the planning profession to be too regulatory or know nothing about it at all. In Jeff Speck’s "Walkable City: How Downtown Can Save America, One Step at a Time," the planning profession is put into a new and comprehensible light. This book isn’t just meant to target the few planners, hard-core walkers, or the odd municipal official. "Walkable City" is a book for the everyday person that manages to put good planning into mainstream conversation. This fun and witty publication isn’t just about walkability, but about the planning that brings about great places.

As co-author of "Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream," Speck is no stranger to cultivating a general interest in planning. In "Walkable City," he begins with why walkability is important to residents, municipalities, and the local economy, with a balance of personal experiences, statistics, and stories. As he continues into the bulk of the book, he narrows all the best practices of planning into four essential types of walks: useful, safe, comfortable, and interesting. These types of walks are further organized into ten easy steps that, if followed, have the power to make our cities and towns more walkable. Using simple, every-day language, his steps are intentionally phrased as verbs to make our communities better places for all.

"Walkable City: How Downtown Can Save America, One Step at a Time" by Jeff Speck

"Walkable City" is the perfect book for all: from the generalist with easy-to-grasp concepts to the urban planner with useful statistics. “While the battle was never declared, many American cities seem to have been made and remade with a mandate to defeat pedestrians.” Now is the perfect time to turn the tide for the walkable city.

What do you think your community is missing to be more walkable? Share your thoughts and your city's stories in the comments area below.

The Global Grid gave away four free copies of this book to four lucky people. Be sure to never miss one of our reviews. Follow #TheGlobalGridReads for our reviews and join our Goodreads group for opportunities to win free books in the future.
Credits: Creative Commons images courtesy of FWStudio and Quintin Gellar. Updated December 7, 2017.

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Born and raised in the Midwest, Jennifer García now enjoys the energy and quality of life that Miami has to offer. Professionally, she uses traditional architecture and principles of the New Urbanism as a Town Planner at Dover, Kohl & Partners....

  • Po Sun

    Living in the Clinton Hill neighborhood of Brooklyn, it is generally a very walkable community, particularly during the day time. Evening time however, for those not used to the area or just moved in, safety becomes a concern especially on streets with poor lighting and other pedestrian presence. However, more generally overall, I would attribute the abundance of trash and litter on the sidewalk and streets to be the main inhibitors of creating better walkability in my neighborhood. However, there doesn’t seem to be any other ways to collect garbage in NYC.

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