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Beijing's Fitness for All Regulations Expand Fitness Acc...

Beijing's Fitness for All Regulations Expand Fitness Access through Tiered (& Free) Pricing

In order to create a next-door “public track and field,” Beijing aims to build a 30 km (18.64 miles) plastic outdoor recreation fitness trail in the parks, fitness squares, and the surrounding neighborhoods. Creating a public track and field has been included as one of Beijing’s important livelihood projects. According to the Beijing Municipal Bureau of Sports, the fitness trail

Park in Mentougou District, Beijing, China

In order to create a next-door "public track and field," Beijing aims to build a 30 km (18.64 miles) plastic outdoor recreation fitness trail in the parks, fitness squares, and the surrounding neighborhoods. Creating a public track and field has been included as one of Beijing's important livelihood projects. According to the Beijing Municipal Bureau of Sports, the fitness trail project has started. Beijing's district officials are negotiating the exact locations. The final plan is expected to be presented before the end of the year.

"This year, Beijing's fitness for all plan will be about facilities and construction," said the project’s manager. Ski related activities are one example. Beijing plans to improve ski facilities, encourage public investment in ski fields, and research and develop residents’ ski equipment. In addition to the use of the facilities, security also received attention. This year, the Beijing Municipal Bureau of Sports compiled a document on fitness management measures, in order to standardize the management of fitness facilities.

Beijing Olympic Park, Beijing, China

To make sports accessible to all people, pricing is an important factor. According to the Beijing Municipal Bureau of Sports, Beijing’s fitness facilities are currently free or low priced for the public. The revised draft of "Beijing Fitness for All Regulations" states that public fitness facilities should be made accessible for all people. Fitness centers should be open no less than 35 hours per week, of which at least 10 hours should be for free.

The Dongdan Sports Center, for example, staggers the peak time entrance fee to welcome all people. Built in 1996, the Dongdan Sports Center has over 20 years of history. It is one of the largest, busiest, and most complete sports centers. In order to manage the flow of people, the center implemented a tiered pricing structure. Its tennis hall, for instance, used to charge 260 Yuan ($40) for the whole day. Now the price has been adjusted to 150 Yuan ($23)/hour in the morning and 300 Yuan ($46)/hour from the afternoon to evening.

In addition to the tiered pricing, many outdoor playgrounds sell tickets at their entrances. Around 10 am yesterday, a young man was about to leave after he finished a football match. He said that it costs 15 Yuan ($2.30) to use the outdoor football course for the entire day, then added: “The price is really low, but I wish there were more amenities, such as a spot for hand washing.”

How are recreational facilities managed in your city? Does your city have a plan for the development of recreational facilities and sports centers? Share your thoughts and your city's stories in the comments area below.

Credits: Images and data linked to sources.

The original article, published in Chinese, can be found here.

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Elle is an urbanist, inspirer, and translator. She was born in mid-south China and received her PhD in Urban and Regional Sciences at Texas A&M University in 2014. She is passionate about words and completes translation work in her free time. ...

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