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Review of “The BLDGBLOG BOOK: Redesigning the Sky”

Review of “The BLDGBLOG BOOK: Redesigning the Sky”

The BLDGBLOG Book by Geoff Manaugh introduces us to speculation about future architecture and how the present built environment will eventually change. From the first page of the book, the reader gets an idea of what he is about to read as he is presented an illustration of London in A.D. 2109. London seems like

BLDG Auroras

The BLDGBLOG Book by Geoff Manaugh introduces us to speculation about future architecture and how the present built environment will eventually change. From the first page of the book, the reader gets an idea of what he is about to read as he is presented an illustration of London in A.D. 2109. London seems like Venice, divided into island fortresses with two extra artificial river Thames.

In Chapter 3, “Redesigning the Sky,” Geoff Manaugh supports that we can use natural phenomena to our advantage with the help of architecture and urban design. Consequently, it will be possible to redefine our cities so that they become more beautiful, interesting, attractive and safe from extreme weather conditions.

BLDG Book Coliseums

Will we be able to recreate, in the future, artificial storms, tornadoes or even hurricanes that had happened in the past? If the answer is yes, the author suggests that we would probably want a place, something like coliseums, in order to gather and stare at these phenomena. What if we could recreate auroras in European cities? In 2005, pulses from radio waves were sent to the sky of Alaska and a bright light was created similar to North Pole auroras. Given the fact that the north magnetic pole is moving from North America to Siberia, Manough imagines the impacts of the movement of North Pole auroras too. If auroras become visible in Siberia or even in Europe then from an architectural point-of-view, buildings will be constructed so that we can see this beautiful and rare phenomenon.

How can we be protected from extreme weather conditions? According to Manough, if an “offshore geotechnical” project was built in the future that would “redirect high-speed tropical winds,” then maybe we wouldn't have to worry about hurricanes or tornadoes again.

However, in addition to the personal, architectural and engineering benefits gained from the utilization of natural phenomena, weather can be used for military purposes too. To prevent this from happening the Environmental Modification Convention was signed in 1977, which prohibits any weather warfare.

We can learn more about the fascinating future of architecture and the possibilities regarding urban planning from the BLDGBLOG and twitter account.

Credits: Images and data linked to sources.

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Athina Kyrgeorgiou graduated from National Technical University of Athens, Greece as a Civil Engineer with a specialization in Transportation Planning and Engineering. She currently lives in Athens, Greece and is always eager to learn about sustai...

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